College and Career Readiness Summer Activity

Helping our students think about college and career readiness is a great thing to do during the summer months. The Family Engagement Commission has found a really fun resource for students in grades 5-12 to use this summer AND they could win a $1,000 scholarship!

Take a few moments to learn more about this program and check out all the resources that Families in Schools has on this important topic: https://www.familiesinschools.org/passport-to-success-college-and-career-edition/

         

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Book Club Discussion: “Strangers from a Different Shore” by Ronald Takaki

Members of the California State PTA Board of Managers have been reading books that give us a deeper understanding of the effects of racial prejudice on our minority populations. We have read eight books including The New Jim Crow, The Color of Law, How to Be An Antiracist, and White Fragility, among others. These books all dealt with the experiences of African Americans in the US. We decide to broaden our scope to other minority groups impacted by racism in America. The most recent book we read was titled Strangers from a Different Shore by Ronald Takaki.

Strangers from a Different Shore is the story of Asian immigration to the U.S.

When Chinese began to immigrate to the U.S. it was because we needed them as laborers. They built the Central Pacific Railroad line, worked in mines digging gold and ore out of the ground, and tilled the fields.

But many Americans saw them as competitors for jobs. Thus, they were denigrated and described as heathen, morally inferior, savage, childlike and lustful.

They came to America for a dream – the dream of a better life. What they found was bigotry and racial discrimination. They were seen as different and inferior; they were strangers, strangers from a different shore. They were different from the European immigrants that Americans were used to. They could not blend in like European immigrants could. The shape of their eyes and the complexion of their skin immediately identified them as different. The individual could not remake himself by shedding his past, language, custom and dress.

For survival and protection, they banded together, thus reinforcing claims that they could not be assimilated, and therefore, could not be Americans.

Eventually other Asian groups immigrated to America. They were not all Chinese, even though many accused them of being so. There were Japanese, Koreans, Filipinos, and Asian Indians. All experienced hostility and racial prejudice.

Laws were enacted prohibiting Asians from becoming U.S. Citizens:

  • The 1790 Naturalization Act, which restricted naturalized citizenship to whites.
  • In 1882 Congress enacted the Chinese Exclusion Law.
  • The Immigration Act of 1924 included the Asian Exclusion Act and National Origins Act. It was a law that prevented immigration from Asia.
  • The Gentlemen’s Agreement (1907) was a series of informal arrangements in which Japan agreed not to issue passports to emigrants to the U.S.

From 1790-1952, Asian immigrants have been defined as racially ineligible for citizenship and subject to severe immigration restrictions. Stereotyped as a “yellow peril” invasion consisting of slavish “coolie” labor competition.

After Pearl Harbor, the U.S. and China declared war on Japan and the two countries became allies. President Roosevelt commented, “By the repeal of the Chinese exclusion laws, we can correct a historic mistake and silence the distorted Japanese propaganda.” Japan had been appealing to Asia to unite in a race war against white America – condemning the U.S. for its discriminating laws and the segregation of Chinese into ghettos.

During World War II, America could not oppose the racist ideology of Nazism while practicing racial discrimination at home, and therefore laws began to change. But guarantees of equal protection under the law had little effect on what happened in society. Asians were often persecuted not for their vices, but for their virtues (hard working, devotion to family, stressing the importance of education.)

Asian immigrants endured discrimination that still resounds years later. Many Asian Americans suffer inequality and feel as though their roles in U.S. history have been overlooked.

Our book group readings on current and historical racial discrimination have inspired our legislation advocates to select legislation that seeks to address some of these wrongs. California State PTA has taken support positions on the following bills:

  • SB 693 (Stern) – This bill would establish the Governor’s Council on Genocide and Holocaust Education to establish best practices for education on genocide, including the Holocaust.
  • AB 57 (Gabriel) – This bill would require a basic course for law enforcement on the topic of hate crimes.
  • AB 101 (Medina) – This bill adds a one-semester course in ethnic studies to graduation requirements commencing 2029–30. The bill would also require schools to offer an ethnic studies course commencing with the 2025–26 school year.
  • SB 17 (Pan) – This bill would establish an Office of Racial Equity tasked with coordinating, analyzing, developing, evaluating, and recommending strategies for advancing racial equity across state agencies.

We encourage our PTA members and all parents to educate themselves regarding issues of racial discrimination. We hope that by educating ourselves on these issues we can become more understanding of the issues facing many in our country today.

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Advocacy Agenda for Equity 2021

California State PTA believes that all children deserve a quality education regardless of the community in which they live, the color of their skin, their language, their gender identity, or their immigration status.

But too many California students from underserved communities are deprived of an equal opportunity to learn. This year we created an equity agenda to address the needs of all of our children. The bills the California State PTA supports are listed below by category.

Poverty, Income, and Racial Inequality

PTA seeks legislation to address poverty, and the income and racial inequities that affect millions of California families.

  • AB 27 (Rivas, Luz D) Homeless children and youths and unaccompanied youths: reporting.
  • AB 57 (Gabriel D) Law enforcement: hate crimes.
  • AB 367 (Garcia, Cristina D) Menstrual products.
  • AB 408 (Quirk-Silva D) Homeless children and youths: reporting.
  • AB 742 (Calderon D) Personal income taxes: voluntary contributions: School Supplies for Homeless Children Voluntary Tax Contribution Fund.
  • AB 1006 (Rubio, Blanca D) Foster care: social worker turnover workgroup.
  • SB 17 (Pan D) Office of Racial Equity.
  • SB 100 (Hurtado D) Extended foster care program working group.
  • AB 14 (Aguiar-Curry D) Communications: broadband services: California Advanced Services Fund.
  • AB 775 (Berman D) Public postsecondary education: basic needs of students.
  • SB 4 (Gonzalez D) Communications: California Advanced Services Fund: deaf and disabled telecommunications program: surcharges.
  • SB 532 (Caballero D) Pupil instruction: high school coursework and graduation requirements: exemptions.
  • SB 682 (Rubio D) Childhood chronic health conditions: racial disparities.
  • AB 37 (Berman D) Elections: vote by mail ballots.
  • AB 546 (Maienschein D) Dependent children: documents: housing.
  • AB 656 (Carrillo D) Child welfare system: racial disparities.
  • SB 274 (Wieckowski D) Local government meetings: agenda and documents.
  • AB 34 Muratsuchi D Broadband for All Act of 2022.
  • AB 256 Kalra D Criminal procedure: discrimination.
  • SB 79 Bradford D State parks: state beaches: County of Los Angeles: Manhattan State Beach: deed restrictions.

Early Learning

PTA supports quality childcare, pre-school and early learning for all children.

  • AB 22 (McCarty D) Childcare: preschool programs and transitional kindergarten: enrollment: funding.
  • AB 92 (Reyes D) Preschool and childcare and development services: family fees.
  • AB 321 (Valladares R) Childcare services: eligibility.
  • AB 393 (Reyes D) Early Childhood Development Act of 2020.
  • AB 1361 (Rubio, Blanca D) Childcare and developmental services: preschool: expulsion and suspension: mental health services: reimbursement rates.
  • SB 50 (Limón D) Early learning and care.
  • SB 725 (Ochoa Bogh R) Early childhood education: parent participation preschool programs.

Health and Welfare

Physical, social, emotional, and mental health needs must be met before students can thrive.

  • AB 452 (Friedman D) Pupil safety: parental notification: firearm safety laws.
  • SB 260 (Wiener D) Climate Corporate Accountability Act.
  • SB 699 (Eggman D) School climate: statewide school climate indicator: surveys.
  • AB 285 (Holden D) State Department of Education: state school nurse consultant.
  • AB 967 (Frazier D) Special education: COVID-19 Special Education Fund.
  • SB 224 (Portantino D) Pupil instruction: mental health education.
  • SB 237 (Portantino D) Special education: dyslexia risk screening.
  • SB 722 (Melendez R) Interscholastic athletics: adult supervisors: cardiopulmonary resuscitation training.
  • AB 234 (Ramos D) Office of Suicide Prevention.
  • AB 270 (Ramos D) Core Behavioral Health Crisis Services System.
  • AB 309 (Gabriel D) Pupil mental health: model referral protocols.
  • AB 586 (O’Donnell D) Pupil health: health and mental health services: School Health Demonstration Project.
  • AB 988 (Bauer-Kahan D) Mental health: mobile crisis support teams: 988 crisis hotline.
  • AB 1117 (Wicks D) Pupil support services: Healthy Start: Toxic Stress and Trauma Resiliency for Children Program.
  • AB 1165 (Gipson D) Juvenile facilities: storage and use of chemical agents and facility staffing.
  • AB 1197 (Quirk-Silva D) School meals: nutritional requirements.
  • SB 14 (Portantino D) Pupil health: school employee and pupil training: excused absences: youth mental and behavioral health.
  • SB 21 (Glazer D) Specialized license plates: mental health awareness.
  • SB 217 (Dahle R) Comprehensive sexual health education and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) prevention education.
  • SB 364 (Skinner D) Pupil meals: Free School Meals For All Act of 2021.
  • AB 48 (Gonzalez, Lorena D) Law enforcement: kinetic energy projectiles and chemical agents.

Education Funding

California’s school finance system must provide stable, sustainable, equitable, and adequate funding to meet the diverse needs of all our students, including before and after-school programs, summer school, and distance learning.

  • AB 99 (Irwin D) Statewide longitudinal data system: California Cradle-to-Career Data System: governance and support.
  • AB 1112 (Carrillo D) Before and after school programs: maximum grant amounts.
  • SB 737 (Limón D) California Student Opportunity and Access Program.
  • AB 75 (O’Donnell D) Education finance – School facilities: Kindergarten-Community Colleges Public Education Facilities Bond Act of 2022.
  • SB 22 (Glazer D) Education finance- School facilities: Public Preschool, K–12, and College Health and Safety.

Teaching

PTA supports the recruitment and development of an educator workforce that is reflective of the student population, and that all students have qualified and effective teachers delivering a full curriculum.

  • AB 312 (Seyarto R) Teacher credentialing: basic skills proficiency test: exemption.
  • AB 437 (Kalra D) Teacher credentialing: subject matter competence.
  • AB 520 (Gipson D) Teacher retention: California Diversifying the Teacher Workforce Grant Program.
  • SB 237 (Portantino D) Special education: dyslexia risk screening.

Curriculum

Instruction should be personalized, culturally relevant, and responsive.  Coursework must address racism and bias to counteract the institutional and structural biases and related traumas that often drive inequitable outcomes for students.

  • AB 101 (Medina D) Pupil instruction: high school graduation requirements: ethnic studies.
  • AB 104 (Gonzalez, Lorena D) Pupil instruction: retention, grade changes, and exemptions.
  • AB 299 (Villapudua D) Career technical education: California Apprenticeship Grant Program.
  • AB 839 (O’Donnell D) Career technical education: California Career Technical Education Incentive Grant Program.
  • ACR 49 (Choi R) Arts Education Month.
  • SB 545  (Wilk R) Pupil retention: COVID-19 impact.
  • SB 628 (Allen D) California Creative Workforce Act of 2021.
  • SB 723 (Rubio D) Pupil instruction: tutoring program: learning loss mitigation.
  • SB 70 (Rubio D) Elementary education: kindergarten.
  • AB 366 (Rubio, Blanca D) Foster youth.

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What’s Happening in PTA? June 2021 Edition

Please find below a listing of California State PTA’s June training and advocacy opportunities for our leaders and members. We hope you will join us for some of these offerings:

June 1, 8, 15, 22, and 29 DEI Virtual Office Hours
7:00-8:00 p.m.
Our Diversity, Equity and Inclusion Committee is available to answer any questions you may have about starting a DEI Committee or making your PTA more inclusive. Spaces are limited, so be sure to register using this link.
June 2 Advocacy Webinar
7:00-8:00 p.m.
Join California State PTA Director of Legislation Shereen Walter and members of the Legislation Team for the last webinar of the 2020-21 term. Topics to be covered include the Governor’s May Revise Budget, SB 793, the SB 70 Action Alert, how to get a strong start to your advocacy year at the unit, council or district level, and the book club selection Strangers from a Different Shore. They will also do a term wrap-up.
 Register here: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/rt/31940121174953740
June 3 Social Media Kit Reveal
7:00 p.m.
Join the Communications Team as they reveal the June kit, which celebrates all the successes you have had this year! We’ll give you social media posts and images to help you communicate with your school community just how much your unit, council or district has accomplished this year. Register here: https://us02web.zoom.us/j/84963519701?pwd=L2hwOWNSK1ZmSHg0c0xpSnNmTjQ2dz09
June 9 Webinar: Diversity, Equity & Inclusion – 6:30 p.m.

Join the California State PTA DEI Committee to hear about more good DEI work being done by your PTA peers throughout the state, and get a glimpse into how another volunteer-run organization enacted their DEI plans.

Planned speakers:

  • Compton Council PTA: Leader Equity
  • Palos Verdes High School PTSA: Crip Camp Viewing and Discussion
  • Sixth District PTA: Speaker Series
  • League of Women Voters: DEI Work in an Established Volunteer-Run Advocacy Organization

Register here: https://us02web.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_14eLVf5NTCaYKZXGqg2jrQ

June 17 Webinar: Closing the Digital Divide – 4:00-5:00 p.m. Join California State PTA and the California Emerging Technology Fund for a webinar featuring special guest Dr. Pedro Noguera, Dean of USC’s Rossier School of Education. Click here to register: https://us02web.zoom.us/meeting/register/tZAocO2spzsoGtNvZeXVmVjmdSo60DOOjU2u

 

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Family Engagement in a Virtual World

This year was different – and Family Engagement was different, too.

Families are struggling with physical and fiscal health. There were so many uncertainties about this school year – and even next year! Our usual routines have been changed dramatically. We have new insights about health and safety at our school sites and how our schools struggle to serve all students. As we struggle to make our own voices heard, we are even more aware of families who are left out of these conversations. 

Families still want to feel connected to school staff and to each other. And teachers and school staff need these connections even more than ever.

How do we keep everyone connected when we can’t meet in person? The same way we did before: by communicating clearly and frequently, by hosting a variety of social and learning activities, and by building authentic relationships. 

Technology removes and creates barriers 

Virtual meetings throughout the state now generate a lot more participation. Parent groups have seen their online meetings filled with new faces and families. Working parents with scheduling challenges have been able to sign in (and keep their cameras off if they are eating dinner.) Participants can also keep their cameras and microphones off during principal chats and meetings until they are comfortable participating. Interpreters can be provided easily through a different audio channel, like FreeConferenceCall.net.

As we know, not all families have access to devices and the Internet, which creates barriers to both instruction and family engagement. Most school districts do not have enough funding to meet all their needs and are now scrambling.

Access isn’t enough. According to Alejandro Gac-Artigas, the Founder and CEO of  Springboard Collaborative, “While distributing WiFi-enabled devices is laudable, academic disparities aren’t widening because privileged kids have access to superior screen time. They’re widening because of all the things their parents are doing off screen.”

“Over the last decade, college-educated parents have quadrupled their investment of time and money in their children, while parents without a college degree have only modestly increased their investment. Experts describe this as a “parenting gap” that leads to a vicious cycle of intergenerational wealth inequality. What matters most in a child’s life is their family. “

Real and appropriate family engagement can help address those disparities.   This means, for example,  supporting community members who may not have an adult at home to help with online learning during school hours or who may not speak English or who may not be literate. Parents, community volunteers and local support agencies have worked with teachers and staff to ask what people need. 

You can offer to be a “reading buddy,” to pick up school supplies, to help new families learn about your school. Check with your school site staff to see how you can help. 

We can still connect with fun activities and events!

Even when we can’t meet in parent rooms or in the yard, our favorite social events can still happen online— accessed by phone or computer. By hosting social events with the same technology used in the classrooms, parents also become more familiar with the technology and can support their students and each other.

Free family arts nights, for example, organized by PTAs and nonprofits like PS Arts in Central and Southern California, are a great way to engage your community. By continuing to offer wildly popular family arts programs virtually using materials found at home or sent in a special kit, arts nights can continue to connect and engage multi-generational families which may have become socially isolated from each other.   

Francis Scott Key Elementary in San Francisco has hosted virtual dance parties, yoga classes, and more!

The National PTA provides more family engagement ideas for a virtual world.

New opportunities to build community and engage families. 

Our families need more connection – not less.

This is a great time to try new events and projects to connect your school community. Introducing your pets (or stuffed animals) on your school communications platform, teaching meditation and mental health strategies online, organizing a donation drive for workspace furniture, recruiting senior and student pen/email pals and reading buddies – all engage families by meeting their needs when creating participation opportunities. Be sure to schedule events at a variety of times on different days so people with different work schedules can participate.

For example, when Alvarado Elementary School in San Francisco recruited parent volunteers to provide tech support to families struggling with distance learning, they both engaged families by providing an opportunity for parents to support each other and helped overcome a specific barrier to parent engagement.

Share your virtual community-building ideas and activities at a Meetup on Saturday, May 15 at 4pm

Next steps:

  1. Find creative ways to make your usual family engagement programs socially distant or remote;
  2. Make sure every family in your school knows where to find information and will receive communications in the way that is best for them; and
  3. Celebrate the creativity and connection of your community!

 

About Kari Gray: A San Francisco resident, public school parent, arts advocate and community engagement specialist, Kari Gray currently works as the Special Projects Manager at ODC/Dance and serves on the Boards of Youth Arts Exchange, the Second District of the California State PTA, and on the Family Engagement Commission and Art Committee for the California State PTA.

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Addressing Microaggressions to Make PTAs More Welcoming

We all want all families to feel welcome at our schools.

An active middle school PTSA was committed to including all voices in their PTSA planning. They worked with their school’s Spanish-bilingual and Chinese-bilingual family liaisons to engage the English-language learner communities at their school and to provide interpretation at their meetings. At every meeting, the Spanish-speaking and Cantonese-speaking families had interpretation and a familiar face to welcome them to the meetings. Before the meeting started, they felt included and welcome to their PTSA.

Yet, when it was time to discuss the budget and upcoming events, the PTSA Board described the events that they had planned and didn’t ask for feedback from all members at the meeting. The Spanish-speaking parents were confused. They had come with their ideas for community events and were excited to share their ideas, but, when they suggested new events or programs, the PTSA Officers asserted that they had already decided what the community events would be.

Do you think that the Spanish-speaking families returned to the next meeting?

“Welcoming All Families” is the first standard of Family Engagement in the National Standards for Family-School Partnerships. Our PTAs provide Welcome Back to School events, mentor families and many other terrific programs, strategies, and initiatives that are described in the National Standards Assessment Guide. We can make our schools even more welcoming by watching for micro-aggressions in your PTA meetings and activities.

Microaggressions are indirect, subtle or unintentional instances of discrimination against members of a marginalized group. Although they are thought of as small actions, microaggressions can have a tremendous impact. In a short PTA video, you can learn how to recognize microaggressions, respond to them and repair relationships in situations where we’ve committed them.

Continue your learning and reflection on micro-aggressions with these questions and resources.

For self-reflection:

  • Are you more often an observer, perpetrator or victim of microaggressions? What does it feel like for you in each of these roles?
  • Which of your identities (i.e., race, immigration status, language, religion, gender, sexuality, ability, household status, etc.) tend to have more “power” and could lead you to unintentionally commit a microaggression? What would it look like in those instances?
  • How does intent and impact show up in how you respond to microaggressions?
  • What has worked and has not worked when you have responded to a microaggression?

For your PTA to discuss:

  • Where have you seen microaggressions play out in your PTA? In your school community?
  • Who is affected by these microaggressions? What is the impact for these people?
  • How can you recognize, respond and repair microaggressions when they occur within your PTA?

Come to the Family Engagement Meet-up during Convention 2021 on May 14 at 4:00 p.m. to reflect on how you and your PTA may become more aware of and address microaggressions at your school.

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Family Engagement: It’s the Law

As PTA members, we know how important family engagement is for student and school success. 

Did you know that family engagement is not just good practice? In California it’s the law! 

The California Department of Education’s Local Control Funding Formula (LCFF) gives local school districts a lot of substantial power to make local decisions that affect their communities. Every local education authority (school district) in California has to submit a plan for how it will use the LCFF funding. 

Learn more about the Local Control Funding Formula (LCFF) and the state’s required Local Control and Accountability Plan (LCAP) here.

Part of your district’s LCAP includes a description of how the district engages families in decision-making and planning. In 2018, California PTA worked with other state Family Engagement partners to pass AB 2828, which requires school districts and charter schools to describe their family engagement strategies and outcomes in specific ways in their annual Local Control and Accountability Plans (LCAP).

What does this look like in your school district?

  • Does your district make every effort to seek parent input in making decisions for your school district and your school site? 
  • How does your district plan to increase participation for students with exceptional needs?
  • What is working and not working for your district?

Learn more about measuring and reporting family engagement at “Family Engagement: It’s the Law,” a Convention 2021 presentation, live Q&A and meet-up on May 12.

Next steps:

  1. Use the National PTA checklist to measure family engagement at your own school site;
  2. Check out the National Standards for family school partnerships to get ideas; 
  3. Attend your school site or district Local Control and Accountability Plan planning meetings;
  4. Find out if your district is using the California State Self-Reflection tool; and
  5. Ask your school and your district how they will engage all families in your community.

 

About Kari Gray: A San Francisco resident, public school parent, arts advocate and community engagement specialist, Kari Gray currently works as the Special Projects Manager at ODC/Dance and serves on the Boards of Youth Arts Exchange, the Second District of the California State PTA, and on the Family Engagement Commission and Art Committee for the California State PTA.

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ETS Update: Spring Assessments

This article was provided by our sponsor ETS. Read more about ETS here.

State tests are underway and like this school year when learning is  different—whether your child is in a school, learning at home, or both—the tests are also different.

We recognize that the COVID-19 pandemic that prompted sudden school closures has created a very challenging learning environment not only for students, but also for parents and teachers. We applaud the hard work, sacrifices and efforts made by families and teachers to help ensure that students continue to learn and progress in their academic career. There is no doubt that the COVID-19 closures have caused learning gaps, which is why it is more important than ever to measure student learning to understand the impact the pandemic and the different learning environments have had on students.

This year, districts have the option to give the California Assessment of Student Performance and Progress (CAASPP) either remotely or in person. The English language arts and mathematics test are shorter than in previous years to decrease stress on students and time it takes away from valuable instruction. School districts will also have more time to administer the assessments. The results of the tests are going to be used for learning only. They will not be used to rate schools but to help identify where leaning loss has occurred and provide the state, teachers, and parents with this very important data to help make decisions on how to best help student catch up.

All the test subjects, in addition to ELA and math, administered under CAASPP are available this year as well as the tests administered to English learners. Most of these tests are available remotely or in person. However, if your child qualifies for the alternate assessments, these tests will need to be given in person because these tests require one-on-one administration with students so they can better demonstrate what they know and can do.

Below is a list of available tests, who takes them, how they are administered, and timeline. Check with your child’s teacher for more information about your child’s testing schedule and which tests they need to take. Parents can also visit the CAASPP/ELPAC website for more information, including instructions and videos on how to prepare for testing at home and practice tests.

Smarter Balanced English Language Arts (ELA) and mathematics (shortened version)

Results for this test will only be used to get information on how to help students.

  • Who takes the test: All students from grades 3-8 and 11 except students participating in the California Alternate Assessments (CAAs) for ELA and mathematics and ELA only for English learners in U.S. schools less than 12 months.
  • How it’s administered: In-person or remote, depending on school district.
  • Testing period: February – July
  • When parents can expect their child’s score report: July 2021

California Alternate Assessments (CAA) in English language arts and mathematics

Results for this test will only be used to get information on how to help students.

  • Who takes the test: Students with the most significant cognitive disabilities whose active individualized education program (IEP) designates the use of an alternate assessment
  • How it’s administered: In-person only
  • Testing period: January – July
  • When parents can expect their child’s score report: September 2021

California Science Test (CAST)

Results for this test will only be used to get information on how to help students.

  • Who takes the test: All students in grades 5 and 8, and once anytime in high school, except eligible students participating in the CAA for Science
  • How it’s administered: In-person or remote, depending on school district
  • Testing period: January – July
  • When parents can expect their child’s score report: July 2021

California Alternate Assessments in Science

Results for this test will only be used to get information on how to help students.

  • Who takes the test: Students with the most significant cognitive disabilities whose active IEP designates the use of an alternate assessment, for grades 5 and 8, and once anytime in high school
  • How it’s administered: In-person only
  • Testing period: September – July
  • When parents can expect their child’s score report: TBD

English Language Proficiency Assessment for California (ELPAC) (Initial and Summative)

Results of this test are used to identify English learners and to reclassify EL status

Initial ELPAC Listening, Speaking, Reading and Writing

  • Who takes the test: K-12 students whose primary language is not English as indicated on the Home Language Survey; administered within 30 calendar days of enrollment
  • How it’s administered: In-person or remote
  • Testing period: All year
  • When parents can expect their child’s score report: As soon as the student takes the test

*Summative ELPAC Listening, Speaking, Reading and Writing

  • Who takes the test: K-12 students who have been identified as English learners and participate annually until reclassified fluent English proficient
  • How it’s administered: In-person or remote
  • Testing period: February – July
  • When parents can expect their child’s score report: June 2021

 *Students who took a locally administered alternate assessment of English proficiency will continue to receive a Summative ELPAC student score report.

California Spanish Assessment

This is an optional test for native English-speaking students who want to demonstrate proficiency in Spanish language.

  • Who takes the test: All students in grades 3-8 and high school who want to demonstrate Spanish reading and language arts
  • How it’s administered: In-person or remote
  • Testing period: January – July

When parents can expect their child’s score report: September 2021

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What’s Happening in PTA? May 2021 Edition

Please find below a listing of California State PTA’s May training and advocacy opportunities for our leaders and members. We hope you will join us for some of these offerings:

May 3-16 Convention 2021 Join hundreds of fellow PTA members and leaders for the 122nd Annual California State PTA Convention! The Business of the Association starts May 13. Click here to register.
May 6 Social Media Kit Reveal
8:00 p.m.
Join the Communications Team as they reveal the May kit themed “Mental Health Awareness Month.”
May 18 DEI Virtual Office Hours
7:00-8:00 p.m.
Looking for guidance about how to begin a DEI committee at your unit, council, or district? Seeking feedback or ideas about how to make a prospective program or event as inclusive as possible? Wondering what PTA Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion trainings, presentations, and resources are available, and how to access them? You can get answers to those questions and more by signing up for a slot during the DEI committee’s weekly virtual office hour, where you can speak directly with a California State PTA DEI committee member. Click here to make an appointment.
May 17-18 BOM Applications Deadline Apply to serve on the Board of Managers (BOM) for the 2021-23 term! Online applications must be submitted by May 18, 2021, and paper applications must be postmarked by May 17, 2021Click here for application forms and more information.
Tuesday, May 25 Leadership Monthly Webinar
7:00-8:30 p.m.
Join Vice President of Leadership Maria Steck and the Leadership Commission as they help you navigate ways to end your PTA term successfully. Click here to register: https://forms.gle/XPdWDKbZDGEVNecG9

 

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Staying Connected with PTA Families in a Virtual World

How do we keep everyone connected when we can’t meet in person? The same way we did before: by communicating clearly and frequently, by hosting a variety of social and learning activities, and by building authentic relationships.

Clear and frequent communication

Every year, PTA works with school staff to establish communication processes and tools. This year, with all the changes and updates, it is even more important to reach every single person in our communities.

We need to ask:

  • How are people coping?
  • What do they need?
  • What is the best way to connect?

Effective family engagement includes all families and caregivers. To reach all families, it is vital to share information in a variety of ways: PTA and school district websites and newsletters, email, text, social media posts, and even with paper flyers and newsletters sent by mail.

Recognizing the need for a whole new way to create engagement and community, the PTA in San Francisco started “4-1-1 Wednesday” virtual gatherings for all San Francisco families. They could join by phone or computer. Topics centered on how to support families and parent groups: fundraising brainstorming, mental health and wellness strategies, and tips on creating an inclusive community. 4-1-1 Wednesdays also feature Town Halls with the District Superintendent and Department of Public Health.

These citywide meetings give parents and caregivers the opportunity to learn from each other and strengthen the entire school district community.

Share your own strategies for communicating with your community during Convention 2021 at our Family Engagement Meet-up on Tuesday, May 11 at 4:00 p.m.

About Kari Gray: A San Francisco resident, public school parent, arts advocate and community engagement specialist, Kari Gray currently works as the Special Projects Manager at ODC/Dance and serves on the Boards of Youth Arts Exchange, the Second District of the California State PTA, and on the Family Engagement Commission and Art Committee for the California State PTA.

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